Resources

Here is a complete listing of all resources and tools appearing on this site, organized by the category under which the resource is posted. Each of these resource categories also has its own page on the website with its own featured resources and resource list.
Use these links to jump down the page to your desired category of resources:

Social Determinants · Enhanced Needs & Assets Assessment · Expanding Partnerships · Cultural Competence · Diverse Youth · Evaluation

 

Social Determinants Resources

Addressing the Social Determinants of Health Within the Patient-Centered Medical Home

The Journal of the American Medical Association This article explores how the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) offers an important opportunity to promote health through systematically addressing the social determinants of health. The article concludes that addressing social determinants of health within the PCMH represents a high-value benefit to the health care system and has the potential to reduce the long-standing socioeconomic disparities in health that continue to persist.

Child Welfare Information Gateway

https://www.childwelfare.gov/systemwide/laws_policies/state/index.cfm

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families This website’s interactive platform allows users to search for both state-specific and topic-specific statutes. Broad topics covered range from Child Abuse and Neglect to Adoption.

Communicating Effectively about Social Determinants of Health that Impact Teen Pregnancyyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI) This tool offers tips and strategies to help raise awareness of social determinants of health that impact teen pregnancy, facilitate discussion among stakeholders, and craft messaging that will resonate with your community.

Community Health Worker National Workforce Study

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, 2007 This report is a comprehensive information resource about community health workers, resulting from a HRSA-funded national study of the CHW workforce that was conducted between 2004 and 2007.

Community Health Workers: Closing Gaps in Families’ Health Resources

Family Strengthening Policy Center, National Human Services Assembly, 2006This overview of CHWs from the perspective of low-income families’ needs highlights the important role of CHWs in reaching vulnerable and underserved families. It reviews the challenges and opportunities for ensuring their place as a sustainable and effective component of health and human service delivery and includes helpful tables and resource lists.

Community Health Workers Toolkit

http://www.raconline.org/communityhealth/chw/

Rural Assistance Center, Health and Human Services Information for Rural America    —  This website provides tools to help you evaluate opportunities for developing a CHW program and develop a program for your area, including resources and best practices developed by successful programs. Each of eight modules concentrates on different aspects of CHW programs.

Community Health Workers: Part of the Solution

Rosenthal et. al. Health Affairs, Vol. 29, No. 7, 1338-1342, 2010 The authors’ recommendations and principles for developing the workforce of CHWs are backed by brief and informative discussion of CHWs’ roles, responsibilities, and contributions. Case studies from two states illustrate how CHWs can be supported and sustained by changes in systems and policies.

Community Health Workers: What do we know about them?

World Health Organization, 2007 This review of existing evidence on the feasibility and effectiveness of CHW programs worldwide assesses the many facets of CHW programs and provides recommendations for fully tapping the potential of this important health resource.

Conducting a Root Cause Analysis and Action Planning Process: Facilitator’s Guideyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI) This tool provides an overview of root cause analysis and offers guidelines for facilitating one in your community to identify individual, interpersonal, community and social factors impacting teen pregnancy, and to recognize potential intervention points.

Creating Trauma-Informed Services: A Guide for Sexual Assault Programs and Their Systems Partners

Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs — This brief guide is full of helpful and insightful information and principles for developing trauma-informed services in many programs, including those serving teens.

Culturally-Sensitive Trauma-Informed Care

Center for Pediatric Traumatic Stress, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia This concise resource provides clear and thoughtful guidance for understanding cultural differences in the perception and interpretation of a trauma event and for providing trauma-informed care that acknowledges, respects, and integrates clients’ and families’ cultural values, beliefs, and practices.

Establishing a Holistic Framework to Reduce Inequities in HIV, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and Tuberculosis in the United States

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2010— This white paper outlines the strategic vision to reduce health disparities and promote health equity. The purpose is to advance a holistic approach to the design of public health programs and thus improve the health of communities and increase their opportunities for healthy living.

A Guide to Promotora Programs

Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., 2004– This guide describes different promotora program models, offers guidelines for implementing and evaluating promotora programs, and provides examples of promotora programs in operation across the nation.

Handling Disclosures of Trauma: Guidelines for EBI Facilitatorsyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI) EBI sessions provide a “safe space” to discuss sensitive and personal issues, which for some youths may trigger disclosures of trauma, such as sexual abuse or dating violence. This job aid/guide sheet helps EBI facilitators to be prepared to handle such disclosures by teens participating in EBI sessions.

Healing the Hurt: Trauma-Informed Approaches to the Health of Boys and Young Men of Color

Drexel University School of Public Health and Drexel University College of Medicine – This commissioned paper offers a multidisciplinary analysis of the role of trauma and adversity in the lives of Latino and African American boys and young men, and examines trauma-informed approaches for improving their health.

Love Doesn’t Have to Hurt Teens

American Psychological Association — This booklet helps teens to recognize, prevent and get help in dealing with violence in dating and other peer relationships.

www.loveisrespect.org

Break the Cycle, National Dating Abuse Helpline — This website aims to engage, educate and empower youth and young adults to prevent and end abusive relationships.

National Child Traumatic Stress Network

http://www.nctsn.org/trauma-types

www.nctsn.org — This website’s comprehensive section on types of trauma includes links to other sections where you can easily locate a wealth of additional resources organized by audience, including many that are focused on diverse adolescents.

Neighborhood-Level Influences on Young Men’s Sexual and Reproductive Health Behaviors

Am J Public Health, 2011 – This analysis linking data at the individual and community levels showed that the socioeconomic status of communities influenced the sexual and reproductive health of the young men in these communities. The findings point to the importance of considering neighborhood context when addressing young men’s sexual and reproductive health behaviors.

A New Way to Talk About the Social Determinants of Health

Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, 2010— This framework explores a simple and effective way to talk about the social determinants of health. The core message is centered on the idea that health starts where we live, learn, work and play.

Plain Talk: The Story of a Community-Based Strategy to Reduce Teen Pregnancy

The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 1998– The real stories and lessons learned from the launching of this initiative in 5 distinctly different communities demonstrate that engaging and training community residents to deliver outreach and education to adults and teens can bring about real and positive change.

Promoting Health Equity: A Resource to Help Communities Address Social Determinants of Health

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention— This workbook is designed for public health practitioners and partners interested in addressing social determinants of health in order to promote health and achieve health equity.

Race Matters: Unequal Opportunities for Adolescent Reproductive Health

The Annie E. Casey Foundation— This fact sheet highlights the barriers and consequences to unequal opportunity especially as it relates to adolescent reproductive health, and provides simple strategies to promote equal opportunities.

Race Matters: Unequal Opportunities for Health and Wellness

The Annie E. Casey Foundation— This fact sheet presents information related to why equal opportunities for health and wellness are important, the barriers, consequences of unequal opportunity, and strategies to address the inequalities. Supported by facts and relevant statistics, this four-page document provides useful information for a range of people from program managers to health care providers.

www.sexetc.org

Answer, Rutgers University — This interactive website, produced by teens for teens, covers “hot topics” in sexual health including relationships, body development, abuse and violence, birth control, LGBTQ issues and more.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention: Exploring Out-of School Approaches

Best Start: Ontario’s Maternal, Newborn and Early Child Development Resource Centre and the Sex Information and Education Council of Canada— This report includes a review of historical perspectives on teen pregnancy, explores assumptions that are made about teen pregnancy, the links to poverty and inequity, theoretical approaches, and provides examples of out-of-school teen pregnancy prevention initiatives.

http://www.thatsnotcool.com/

Futures without Violence, Dept. of Justice, The Advertising Council — That’s Not Cool provides tools to help teens “draw a digital line” to deal with harassment, pressure and controlling behaviors by friends and significant others through texting and online.

Trauma-Informed Care for Children Exposed to Violence: Tips for Pregnancy Prevention Programs

Safe Start Center, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Programs— This tip sheet describes specific strategies and steps teen pregnancy prevention programs can take to build their capacity to provide trauma-informed services, helping to prevent and reduce the impact of exposure to violence on their teen clients.

Working with Diverse Communities: Strategies Guided by Best Practiceyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI), 2012— To help Part A grantees to effectively address disparities and inequities in adolescent health, this document provides a list of recommended strategies specific to working with diverse communities around teen pregnancy prevention.

 

Enhanced Needs & Assets Assessment Resources

Advancing Better Outcomes for All Children: Reporting Data Using A Racial Equity Lens

Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2008 This guide provides users with guidelines and tips for presenting data on race and racial equity in responsible ways that produce a strong case for addressing equity for all children.

Assessing Community Needs and Resources (Chapter 3)

Community Toolbox, Work Group for Community Health and Development, University of Kansas, 2012 This chapter in the Community Toolbox, a resource for free information on essential skills for building healthy communities, provides tools, checklists, real world examples, and PowerPoint summaries to help support the preparation of a community assessment.

Basic Field Guide to the Positive Deviance Approach

Positive Deviance Initiative, 2010 This brief guide provides a basic understanding of how to apply the strength-based, positive deviance problem-solving approach for behavior and social change in your community. This approach enables the community to discover existing solutions to complex problems within the community.

Brainstorm: Community Assets

Healthy People 2020, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2012 This one-page tool from the Healthy People 2020 website page on assessing community resources, provides a helpful checklist of community assets in six categories for working with your planning group to take stock of the strengths in your community. The website page provides additional information and resources for assessing and prioritizing your community’s needs and assets with a social determinants lens.

Community Health Assessment and Group Evaluation (CHANGE) Action Guide: Building a Foundation of Knowledge to Prioritize Community Needs

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2010— This comprehensive data-collection tool and planning resource assists community members to gather and organize data on community assets and facilitates identification of actions to transform communities to support healthy living. Easy-to-use Excel spreadsheets are included for collection of local-level data from schools, work sites, community organizations, and health care facilities.

Community Needs Assessment Tool Kit

Missouri Association for Community Action, 2009 Developed for use by community action agencies in Missouri, this tool kit guides users through an integrated needs assessment to build an understanding of social determinants in the community. Included are information and tools for data gathering involving community members around conditions of poverty and related issues of employment, income, education, housing, nutrition, transportation, and health; analysis; prioritizing of issues; and steps for strategic planning.

The Community Toolbox

Workgroup for Community Health and Development, University of Kansas This website provides step-by-step guidance, practical tools and evidence-based approaches for engaging communities to promote community health and development. Chapter 3 provides extensive information and resources on community needs and assets assessment.

Racial Equity Impact Analysis: Assessing Policies, Programs, and Practices

Annie E. Casey Foundation, 2006 This one-page tool, part of the “Race Matters Toolkit,”  provides a set of five guiding questions to use with broad community participation to assess specifically what kinds of racial outcomes are likely to result from existing and proposed policies, programs, or practices that involve your organization

See it Our Way: Participatory photography as a tool for advocacy

Photovoice, 2011This resource from the Photovoice website explains how helping people use photography to record, reflect on, and promote dialogue around their community’s problems and strengths can add value and impact to an advocacy campaign and gives clear practical pointers to how to go about planning and setting up such a project.

Working with Diverse Communities: Strategies Guided by Best Practiceyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI), 2012— To help Part A grantees to effectively address disparities and inequities in adolescent health, this document provides a list of recommended strategies specific to working with diverse communities around teen pregnancy prevention.

 

Expanding Partnerships Resources

Being Y-AP Savvy: A Primer on Creating & Sustaining Youth Adult Partnerships

ACT for Youth Center of Excellence, 2010– This manual provides tools to help your organization envision and build effective and action-oriented youth/adult partnerships that will work to benefit your programs, your youth clients and the larger community.

Community Health Worker National Workforce Study

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, 2007 This report is a comprehensive information resource about community health workers, resulting from a HRSA-funded national study of the CHW workforce that was conducted between 2004 and 2007.

Community Health Workers: Closing Gaps in Families’ Health Resources

Family Strengthening Policy Center, National Human Services Assembly, 2006This overview of CHWs from the perspective of low-income families’ needs highlights the important role of CHWs in reaching vulnerable and underserved families. It reviews the challenges and opportunities for ensuring their place as a sustainable and effective component of health and human service delivery and includes helpful tables and resource lists.

Community Health Workers: Part of the Solution

Rosenthal et. al. Health Affairs, Vol. 29, No. 7, 1338-1342, 2010 The authors’ recommendations and principles for developing the workforce of CHWs are backed by brief and informative discussion of CHWs’ roles, responsibilities, and contributions. Case studies from two states illustrate how CHWs can be supported and sustained by changes in systems and policies.

Community Health Workers Toolkit

http://www.raconline.org/communityhealth/chw/

Rural Assistance Center, Health and Human Services Information for Rural America    —  This website provides tools to help you evaluate opportunities for developing a CHW program and develop a program for your area, including resources and best practices developed by successful programs. Each of eight modules concentrates on different aspects of CHW programs.

Community Health Workers: What do we know about them?

World Health Organization, 2007 This review of existing evidence on the feasibility and effectiveness of CHW programs worldwide assesses the many facets of CHW programs and provides recommendations for fully tapping the potential of this important health resource.

Community Toolbox website

The Community Toolbox website is a virtual compendium of capacity-building resources, including detailed and practical information on building partnerships, assessing community needs, community engagement, advocacy and sustaining the work.

Confronting the Glass Ceiling of Youth Engagement

Academy for Educational Development– This paper, based on case studies and interviews with young people, adult allies, community organizers and others, provides strategies for overcoming barriers to meaningful youth engagement.

Culturally-Based Capacity Building: An approach to working in communities of color for social change

National Community Development Institute, 2007 This paper describes guiding principles and essential components of NCDI’s community capacity building model, a key aspect of which is building relationships across cultural identity groups and “forming viable partnerships across racial, social and cultural fault lines”.

Essential Tips for Successful Collaboration

Joint Work Group on School-Based Teen Pregnancy Prevention– These tips, based on the experience of a national school-based teen pregnancy prevention initiative, describe key elements that contribute to the development and sustainability of successful collaborations around complex issues.

A Guide to Promotora Programs

Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., 2004– This guide describes different promotora program models, offers guidelines for implementing and evaluating promotora programs, and provides examples of promotora programs in operation across the nation.

Lessons Learned: Top 10 Tips for Working with Schools

South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, 2012 This tip sheet highlights ten lessons learned for working with schools. Although not all encompassing, they are based on years of working with schools across South Carolina.

Plain Talk Starter Kit: A Practical Guide to Community-Based Programming to Reduce Teen Pregnancy, STDs, and HIV/AIDS

The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 1999– This starter kit provides guidelines for implementing the Plain Talk initiative in your own community, and covers five basic components: community mapping, resident network, developing resident involvement and leadership, education and skills building, and reinforcing key messages.

Plain Talk: The Story of a Community-Based Strategy to Reduce Teen Pregnancy

The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 1998– The real stories and lessons learned from the launching of this initiative in 5 distinctly different communities demonstrate that engaging and training community residents to deliver outreach and education to adults and teens can bring about real and positive change.

The Power of an Untapped Resource: Exploring Youth Representation on your Board or Committee

Association of Alaska School Boards– This booklet, developed by youth, provides specific and practical guidelines and checklists for preparing your board for youth involvement, recruiting, choosing and educating youth members, and creating an infrastructure supporting shared youth/adult decision-making.

Sharing a Legacy of Caring: Partnerships between Health Care and Faith-Based Organizations

National Center for Cultural Competence and HRSA Bureau of Primary Health Care, 2001– This monograph explores the potential of cooperative partnerships between health care and faith-based organizations to better meet the needs of vulnerable and underserved populations, to reduce health disparities and achieve community health goals.

Working with Diverse Communities: Strategies Guided by Best Practiceyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI), 2012–To help Part A grantees to effectively address disparities and inequities in adolescent health, this document provides a list of recommended strategies specific to working with diverse communities around teen pregnancy prevention.

 

Cultural Competence Resources

Anthropology in the Clinic: The Problem of Cultural Competency and How to Fix it

Arthur Kleinman and Peter Benson, PLoS Medicine, Oct. 2006 The authors describe pitfalls of using culturally based assumptions in clinical relationships and present an approach for providers that places the client’s explanation and viewpoint alongside their own expert knowledge to understand the condition as the client feels, perceives, and responds to it. Their six steps for culturally informed care are applicable in any care setting.

Community Health Worker National Workforce Study

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration, Bureau of Health Professions, 2007 This report is a comprehensive information resource about community health workers, resulting from a HRSA-funded national study of the CHW workforce that was conducted between 2004 and 2007.

Community Health Workers: Closing Gaps in Families’ Health Resources

Family Strengthening Policy Center, National Human Services Assembly, 2006This overview of CHWs from the perspective of low-income families’ needs highlights the important role of CHWs in reaching vulnerable and underserved families. It reviews the challenges and opportunities for ensuring their place as a sustainable and effective component of health and human service delivery and includes helpful tables and resource lists.

Community Health Workers: Part of the Solution

Rosenthal et. al. Health Affairs, Vol. 29, No. 7, 1338-1342, 2010 The authors’ recommendations and principles for developing the workforce of CHWs are backed by brief and informative discussion of CHWs’ roles, responsibilities, and contributions. Case studies from two states illustrate how CHWs can be supported and sustained by changes in systems and policies.

Community Health Workers Toolkit

http://www.raconline.org/communityhealth/chw/

Rural Assistance Center, Health and Human Services Information for Rural America    —  This website provides tools to help you evaluate opportunities for developing a CHW program and develop a program for your area, including resources and best practices developed by successful programs. Each of eight modules concentrates on different aspects of CHW programs.

Community Health Workers: What do we know about them?

World Health Organization, 2007 This review of existing evidence on the feasibility and effectiveness of CHW programs worldwide assesses the many facets of CHW programs and provides recommendations for fully tapping the potential of this important health resource.

Cultural Competence Works

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services Administration, 2001—  This report describes successful methods and practices of HRSA-funded health service organizations recognized for their delivery of culturally competent services for diverse populations. Successful practices are clearly summarized and numerous examples illustrate methods and practices these organizations have implemented to enhance their ability to serve culturally and linguistically diverse populations in different settings.

Culture is Like an Iceberg

National Community Development Institute— This one-page graphic illustrates the many dimensions of culture that affect people’s thinking, their communication, and how they experience the world.

Cultural Competency Organizational Self Assessment (OSA) Question Bank

AIDS Education & Training Centers, Organizational subset of the AETC Cultural Competence and Multicultural Care Workgroup— This Question Bank includes organizational self-assessment questions based on the CLAS Standards that can be easily adapted for assessing cultural and linguistic competence in adolescent health and youth-serving organizations.

DiversityRx: Improving Health Care in a Diverse World

www.diversityrx.org

This website provides multiple resources, tools, and learning opportunities to help individuals and organizations provide culturally and linguistically responsive health services for diverse populations.

Effective Communication Tools for Healthcare Professionals

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Health Resources and Services AdministrationThis free, self-paced on-line course provides training to improve patient-provider communication and is offered with or without continuing education credits.

A Guide to Promotora Programs

Planned Parenthood Federation of America, Inc., 2004– This guide describes different promotora program models, offers guidelines for implementing and evaluating promotora programs, and provides examples of promotora programs in operation across the nation.

Health Care Languages Services Implementation Guide

Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services This interactive web-based guide is intended to help health care organizations implement effective LAS to meet the needs of their patients with limited English proficiency (LEP) patients and increase their access to health care.

Improving Quality and Achieving Equity: The Role of Cultural Competence in Reducing Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care

Joseph R. Betancourt, The Commonwealth Fund, 2006 This foundation report reviews key principles of quality; reviews evidence of the existence and root causes of racial and ethnic health disparities and recommendations to address them; and discusses strategies by which the quality and cultural competence movements could be linked.

National Center for Cultural Competence

A comprehensive array of excellent self-assessment tools, online courses, data vignettes, and promising practices for increasing cultural competence in health care and mental health care is available from this website.

National Standards on Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services (CLAS)

Office of Minority Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services The 14 CLAS Standards, organized by themes, are intended to inform, guide, and facilitate required and recommended practices for providing culturally and linguistically appropriate health services. From this web page, you can also link to an executive summary and a full report on the standards.

Plain Talk: The Story of a Community-Based Strategy to Reduce Teen Pregnancy

The Annie E. Casey Foundation, 1998– The real stories and lessons learned from the launching of this initiative in 5 distinctly different communities demonstrate that engaging and training community residents to deliver outreach and education to adults and teens can bring about real and positive change.

Working with Diverse Communities: Strategies Guided by Best Practiceyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI), 2012— To help Part A grantees to effectively address disparities and inequities in adolescent health, this document provides a list of recommended strategies specific to working with diverse communities around teen pregnancy prevention.

Young Men’s Clinic

New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH)/Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC)The Young Men’s Clinic (YMC), one of the best known clinics for males in the country, offers low-cost, high-quality, “male-friendly” health services for all men 13-35 years of age, with a focus on sexual and reproductive health. Serving a diverse population primarily from Washington Heights, Harlem, and the Bronx, the YMC offers a wide array of services, including routine medical care, STI and HIV testing, counseling, health information, free condoms, and referrals for employment, educational, vocational, health, and social services.

 

Diverse Youth Resources

Healing the Hurt: Trauma-Informed Approaches to the Health of Boys and Young Men of Color

Drexel University School of Public Health and Drexel University College of Medicine – This commissioned paper offers a multidisciplinary analysis of the role of trauma and adversity in the lives of Latino and African American boys and young men, and examines trauma-informed approaches for improving their health.

Health Equity Series: Responding to LGBT Health Disparities

Missouri Foundation for Health— This paper reviews research, presents definitions of the variety of terms used to describe sexual and gender minorities, explores common experiences among LGBT individuals that impact their ability to lead healthy lives and offers policy recommendations that will lead to greater health equity and improved health outcomes in the state of Missouri.

Involving Males in Preventing Teen Pregnancy: A Guide for Program Planners

Urban Institute, 1997 – This classic report by the Urban Institute reviewed 24 community-based teen pregnancy prevention programs that successfully involved males using different approaches and agency settings. See especially Chapter 4, which extracts lessons learned, elements of success, and essential approaches that can be applied by today’s TPP programs to attract and engage a critical mass of young male participants.

Learning From the Field: Programs Serving Youth Who Are LGBTQI2-S and Experiencing Homelessness

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration— This practice brief was developed for families, caretakers, advocates and providers to provide basic information in order to help families support their LGBT children as well as share some critical new research regarding the impact that families have on their LGBT children’s health, mental health and well-being.

Male Friendliness Assessment Tool

Youth First, Massachusetts Alliance on Teen Pregnancy – Use this assessment tool with community partners to assess readiness for engaging young men and help create an action plan to strengthen capacity to serve their reproductive health needs.

The Man Cave

Safe Teens, Pennsylvania Department of Health – This section of the Safe Teens website, sponsored by the Pennsylvania Department of Health, provides information and answers young men’s questions about sex, condoms, hormonal and emergency contraception, alcohol use, and men’s body image.

One Size Does Not Fit All: Meeting the Health Care Needs of Diverse Populations

The California Endowment— This report provides a framework to develop and employ practices for meeting diverse patient needs. Arguing there is no “one size fits all” solution, the report offers solutions to overcome some of the challenges that hospitals or health care organizations may face when trying to ensure quality health care.

Recommendations for High School Out-of-School Time Programs Fortified by Teen Perspectives and Experiences

Our Community’s Children, 2013 – This report, recommended by a CDC Teen Pregnancy Prevention grantee, features the voices of youth participants in out-of-school-time programs in one city. The appended tools for surveying youth and program staff can be especially helpful for identifying recruitment and retention strategies as well as strengths and weaknesses of existing programs.

Recruitment and Retention in Youth Development Programming

The Prevention Researcher, 2005This article focuses on the factors that motivate teens to participate and remain involved in programs, including the availability of opportunities, the interest and relevance of activities, and the degree to which programs enable youth to experience competence, autonomy and relatedness.

Recruitment and Retention Planning Tool

South Carolina Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, May 2013 – Use this tool, developed by the SC Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy, to plan strategies to assist in recruitment and retention of youth. In addition, please reference the supplemental document, Tips for Participant Recruitment and Retention, for proven effective methods of recruitment and retention.

Recruiting and Retaining Older African American and Hispanic Boys in After-School Programs: What We Know and What We Still Need to Learn

Kauh TJ. Public/Private Ventures (P/PV) Groundwork Series, 2010 – Based on a study of 10 programs identified as successful in recruiting and retaining middle- and high-school-aged African American and Hispanic males, this report summarizes effective recruitment and retention strategies and makes practical recommendations for after-school programs, intermediaries and researchers.

Recruitment, Retention and Engagement

Office of Adolescent Health – This section of the OAH’s Teen Pregnancy Prevention Resource Center focused on recruitment, retention and engagement offers a wealth of training resources in the form of toolkits, webinars, presentations, and fact sheets.

Rules of Engagement: Participant Recruitment and Retention

Office of Adolescent Health – Read the transcript or listen to the audio and view the slides from this informative and practical presentation of successful strategies for recruiting and engaging youth in out-of-school time programs. A case study provides concrete examples of recruitment and retention efforts that incorporate positive youth development.

Teen Pregnancy Prevention: Exploring Out-of School Approaches

Best Start Resource Centre of Ontario and SIECCAN (Sex Information and Education Council of Canada) – This report explores historical perspectives, assumptions and stereotypes around teen pregnancy, discusses the influence of poverty and inequity, and provides examples of effective out-of-school teen pregnancy prevention initiatives.

Why Teens Are Not Involved in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Youth Perspective

Child Trends Research-to-Results Brief, July 2009 – Based on a roundtable discussion with Washington, D.C. youth ages 13-18, this brief presents the teen viewpoint on 3 key issues: 1) why youth don’t attend programs, 2) how to get youth to show up, and 3) what youth want in programs.

Wise Guys

Family Life Education Services, Children’s Home Society of NC; Greensboro, NC – Wise Guys is an evaluated multi-session teen pregnancy prevention program for young males. Its aim is to prevent adolescent pregnancy by teaching self-responsibility in the areas of sexual development, decision-making, and relationships. Implemented with diverse groups of males in a variety of settings, Wise Guys emphasizes the ways in which concepts of masculinity and manhood affect how teenage males approach relationships and sexual decision making, with the broad goals of redefining male strength and transforming male culture.

Working with Diverse Communities: Strategies Guided by Best Practiceyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI), 2012 – To help Part A grantees to effectively address disparities and inequities in adolescent health, this document provides a list of recommended strategies specific to working with diverse communities around teen pregnancy prevention.

Young Men’s Clinic

New York Presbyterian Hospital (NYPH)/Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC)The Young Men’s Clinic (YMC), one of the best known clinics for males in the country, offers low-cost, high-quality, “male-friendly” health services for all men 13-35 years of age, with a focus on sexual and reproductive health. Serving a diverse population primarily from Washington Heights, Harlem, and the Bronx, the YMC offers a wide array of services, including routine medical care, STI and HIV testing, counseling, health information, free condoms, and referrals for employment, educational, vocational, health, and social services.

 

Evaluation Resources

Community Pathways to Improved Adolescent Sexual and Reproductive Health: A Conceptual Framework and Suggested Outcome Indicators

Interagency Working Group (IAWG) on the Role of Community Involvement in ASRH,  2007– In addition to providing a conceptual framework describing community involvement for social change, this document offers guidelines and outcome indicators for measurement of community involvement and resulting community structural and normative changes.

The Community Toolbox, Participatory Evaluation

Workgroup for Community Health and Development at the University of Kansas– The Community Toolbox website is a virtual compendium of capacity-building resources, including detailed and practical information on building partnerships, assessing community needs, community engagement, advocacy and sustaining the work. This chapter defines participatory evaluation and answers the questions why, when, who and how.

Participatory Evaluation: What is it? Why do it? What are the challenges?

Partnership for the Public’s Health,  2002– This policy brief discusses key concept and features of participatory evaluation and offers tips for conducting such evaluations.

Participatory Evaluation with Young People

Program for Youth and Community, University of Michigan– This workbook for youth describes participatory evaluation as “learning for action” and provides practical tools and learning activities for youth to plan, conduct and act upon assessments of programs and institutions in their communities.

Using Data in Multi-Agency Collaborations: Guiding Performance to Ensure Accountability and Improve Programs

P/PV Public/Private Ventures and Child Trends, 2012– This report is designed to help collaborating organizations anticipate and address common challenges associated with multi-agency evaluations of joint initiatives to improve services.

Working with Diverse Communities: Strategies Guided by Best Practiceyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.

JSI Research & Training Institute (JSI), 2012– To help Part A grantees to effectively address disparities and inequities in adolescent health, this document provides a list of recommended strategies specific to working with diverse communities around teen pregnancy prevention.

WDC Strategies Assessment/ Selection Tools

The assessment tools are designed for Part A grantees to select Strategies Guided by Best Practice that are relevant to their work in engaging diverse communities in their TPP effort. The information gathered will inform the WDC strategies to be included in their Work and Evaluation plans and subsequently in the Performance Measure Reporting Tool (PMRT). The use of these tools is optional. Technical assistance on the use of these tools and how to integrate the Strategies into Work and Evaluation Plans are provided by JSI upon request.

  1. Assessment Tool for Clinic Partnersyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.
    This tool refers to strategies #27-37 and indicates where in the “process” each clinic partner is in implementation of the “clinic specific” WDC strategies.
  2. Assessment Tool for Implementation Partnersyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.
    This tool refers to strategies #19-26 and indicates where in the “process” each implementation partner is in the implementation of “evidence-based program specific” WDC strategies.
  3. Assessment Tool for Part A Granteesyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.
    This tool uses the information gathered by the clinic and implementation partner assessment tools to inform selection of the WDC strategies to be included in your Work and Evaluation plans, and in the PMRT to be submitted to the CDC
  4. Planning Questions for Implementation of Strategiesyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.
    This handout demonstrates how to use the Who-What-How-Where-When approach to help plan specific action steps to implement selected WDC ‘strategies guided by best practice’.
  5. Grouping Strategies for Implementationyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.
    This handout helps to simplify the 37 WDC ‘strategies guided by best practice’ by showing how they reflect just a few key underlying themes, and by indicating which strategies overlap with others, so that programs implementing one of them are well on their way to implementing others.

WDC Strategies Documentation/Evaluation Tools

JSI has developed two additional tools to facilitate the evaluation of the WDC Strategies selected for implementation by Part A grantees and their partners. Technical assistance on the use of these tools and how to integrate the Strategies into Work and Evaluation Plans are provided by JSI upon request.

  1. Process Measures to Assess WDC Strategiesyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.
    These measures provide guidance on how to document the implementation of a selected WDC strategy.
  2. Quality Indicators to Assess the implementation of WDC Strategiesyellow star icon indicating that the item is a JSI publication.
    These indicators provide guidance on how to assess whether a selected WDC strategy has been implemented with “high quality”.